click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
. egyptian president mohamed morsi addressed a deeply divided nation this evening, calling for his countrymen to unite behind the new constitution. >> ( translated ): to all egyptian people, you kind people, men and women, we stand today to celebrate our new constitution. it's a historic day. egypt and egyptians now have a free constitution-- it's not a grant from a king, imposed by a president or imposed by an occupier. it's a constitution selected by the egyptian people at their own free will. >> warner: the document, which morsi signed into law last night, was approved by voters, after months of street turmoil, and accusations that he and his muslim brotherhood rammed the charter through the ratification process. morsi argued that speedy action was critical to restore stability to egypt. but opposition leaders-- like mohammed el-baradei-- insisted the document will enshrine islamist rule at the expense of hard-won liberties. he spoke monday on the "newshour." >> it defies a lot of the basic human value we live by, like freedom of religion, freedom of expression, independence of the judicia
turned out to bury mohammed hilal, to mourn the loss of a 22-year-old student who gave out polio vaccine in his spare time. but they also came to express public outrage at this week's murders. nine young people, six of them women, one just 17, have been gunned down since monday, and not at random. a series of coordinated assassinations targeting an annual three day polio vaccination campaign. >> ( translated ): we go out door to door and risk our lives to save innocent children from being permanently handicapped. for what? so that our coming generations turn out to be healthy. we work for our country and we are being rewarded in the form of death. what kind of justice is this? why are we targeted and killed? >> reporter: until someone claims responsibility, we won't know why. the taliban haven't come forward, but extreme islamist groups have long opposed western health interventions and the role for women in campaigns. frustration is compounded by the fact they were making such good progress. there were just 56 cases of polio in pakistan this year, the lowest ever. up until the 1950s, po
with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and i
as supporters and opponents of president mohammed morsi faced off in cairo. the two sides threw rocks, sticks and firebombs as night fell outside the presidential palace. at least 126 people were hurt. and there were reports that masked men set fire to morsi's political party headquarters. protests erupted last week after the president assumed sweeping powers and a committee dominated by islamists rushed through a new constitution. the nation's busiest port complex is back in business after an eight-day strike halted operations. the ports of los angeles and long beach, california reopened today after port operators and the worker's union reached an agreement late tuesday. the union said it won new protections against job outsourcing. port officials said during the walkout, they were unable to move some $760 million worth of cargo a day. wall street had a day of ups and downs and investors watched economic reports and weighed chances for a fiscal cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to clo
, demanding that president mohammed morsi leave office. he's assumed absolute powers and refuses to call off a vote on a constitution drafted by islamists. earlier in the day, in cairo's tahrir square, protesters gathered to speak out against morsi. >> ( translated ): we are not fanatics, we are not barbarians, we are devout muslims and devout christians. this is what he has to respect. he did not keep one of his promises whatsoever. we are going down the drain. if the constitutional decree is not revoked we are facing a dead end. >> sreenivasan: later, the government postponed the start of early voting on the constitution. top officials also said morsi might be willing to postpone the referendum if he can reach some agreement with the opposition. on the syrian diplomatic front, secretary of state hillary clinton said today russia and the u.s. will support new efforts to mediate peace. but clinton underscored that the u.s. still insists that president bashar assad leave power. she spoke today in northern ireland, a day after meeting with russian foreign minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. en
marketplace, 60-year-old pensioner mohamed taha bemoaned the upheaval that has kept tourists and business away. >> ( translated ): we want life to go on. it doesn't matter if people say yes to constitution or say no. >> warner: but samer shehata says it may be hard for egypt to move on after the vote. if this referendum is adopted, is approved as expected, where does that leave egyptian society? >> it produces a very divided, polarized egyptian society, one in which many of those liberal secular voices will feel that the constitution is an illegitimate document, and that certainly is not healthy for democratic consolidation in egypt. >> warner: for an egypt still waiting for the promise of the revolution to be fulfilled in its citizens' daily lives, that would be a bleak prospect indeed. we asked two experts to weigh in on the discontent in egypt. read their responses on "the rundown." >> woodruff: again, the major developments of the day: a gunman walked into an elementary school in newtown, connecticut and killed 26 people, including 20 children. the killer then committed suicide. it was the
mohammed morsi are sounding the call for nationwide protests again tomorrow against a constitution drafted by islamists. the opposition was bolstered after saturday's first round of voting on the document. only about a third of eligible voters turned out, as 57% approved the draft-- a much lower level of support than predicted. the second round of voting is saturday. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we pick up now on some of the major questions being asked about guns, mental health and other issues in the aftermath of the shootings. we get four perspectives. dan gross is the president of the brady campaign to end gun violence. david kopel is an adjunct professor of constitutional law at the university of denver and the research director for the libertarian-leaning independence institute. katharine nordal is with the american psychological association. and dr. irwin redlener is a pediatrician at columbia university who works on public and family health issues. he's the president of the children's health fund. we thank you all for being with us.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7